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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)
(train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> republicans sharpening their budget knives. democrats just licking their political shops. frankly, we don't know what all the fuss is about. ♪ welcome, everybody. i'm cheryl casone. republicans planning to outdo paul ryan with a budget blueprint that has democrats crying. we are wondering why. this is a ten year plan. in the lot can change into an years. does look at how things change the last ten years. ten years ago barack obama was unknown. in years ago lance armstrong was like to. in years ago there was no iphone. i think it was called itunes. a lot has happened in ten years. it makes you wonder what will happen in the next ten years which is making our next guest wonder if the fuss over these cuts is all for
of the game. kicking the can is the best way to describe what happens. think of the economy and where it could be in tin years. unemployment, the rate of inflation with the federal reserve policies, we might be looking in a significant threat of inflation. so in the amount of budget cutting that they do, the value of dollars cut will be diminished. cheryl: she has a great point, and there is another issue. in fact, if you look at overall what congress can are cannot do in the next and here's, they're going to change their minds. we have seen that with the fight over entitlement programs. everyone comes in saying there will address medicare, social security and medicaid, and they never do it because reelection comes of senate and later. >> well, in fact, we should be celebrating an anniversary, popping champagne corks because it was exactly 12 years ago tomorrow that alan greenspan testified before congress and said the biggest challenge this country has in terms of fiscal issues is that the budget surplus is getting so large that we will have no choice but to buy stock in private companies. tw
to productivity. the only way economy grows is adding more people. unions run counter to that and why more people are against them. >> steve when they spend millions on issues they are losing, that is union dues money and doesn't fall out of the sky. >> yes, they are heavily in politics and union members don't have to pay for politicing and focusing on the bargains they don't pay the dues. it is overreach. >> are they toothless tigers. >> no, you have to keep an eye on this. the great state of california numbers are on the swing. they are coming from the latino community. one group of people that republicans are trying to become friends with. >> look at overall figures. union members down below 7 percent, emake. >> that's right. we haven't seen this in decades, david. the gig is uon the other side of the aisle. taxpayers realize that government unions lobby for more spend more tax hikes and meaning property taxes go up. why? to pay for the benefits . taxpayers are saying wait a second, we get it . the union members understand the back lash, too. >> bill, your back shot was hard to digest, but the
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
a greater growth in the u.s. economy i think is still a question mark. >> down europe, up 10% china. okay. china, can be a source of top line growth. latin america could be a source of top line growth. >> and when asked about china, the words for sure, the idea that china is staging a rebound. >> and this is despite the fact that they have terrible fraud there. kind of overlooked it. when you're in that virtuous circle, it doesn't seem to matter what you say that's negative. people want to grasp the positive. it's a different kind of market from what we've had for multiple years. >> and to melissa's point about correlation, it's not that risk on, risk off, which we have dealt with for so long now. every hedge fund would come in, and say, europe's bad today, risk off. >> there are no more excuses for the fund managers who are underperforming the s&p 500. this year could be a good year, a different kind of year from the hedge funds that have done so poorly. >> they're going to have to do actual work. >> right. they will have to show performance now. >> they'll have to go through these quart
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. sandra: you think our ranking crisis was ba back in 2008? it was, but imagine iceland. their three against banks failed. they just failed, the banks of the same leveraged that our state of the governments took the opposite approach of the u.s. so did the world end? hardly so, david. david: the world economic forum with a leader who had to make that tough choice. liz: david, the world hardly froze up and ended for iceland. sure, they had majo have major , 10% unemployment, 90% of the value lost, but today it is a much different story. we want to hear about this from the president of iceland. welcome, mr. president. >> thank you. liz: in the u.s. a lot of people still wonder what would have happened if we had let our banks fail. i know is a completely different scale, but talk about your experience and back then in 2800 google did was to allow something like that to happen. >> even though the scale is different in iceland, whether they are at large, small, they face simil
to a better economy. keys to your house, a new house hopefully. connell: let's talk about the markets. nicole petallides starts us off as she does each day with stocks now. nicole: taking a look at a market that really has shown strength over the last seven of the past nine weeks. the dow trading as high as 13,682 prior to pulling back here into negative territory. we are seeing multi- year highs. while they see the trend to the upside, they rally to resist it levels. i wanted to take a look. it was lower in the free market. the cfo, chief financial officer, gave an outlook for 2013. it is now trading higher on this conference call. their wireless margins took a jump. a good outlook. back to you. dagen: thank you. congress is heading back to work just one day after president asked both parties to come together and stand behind his visions. connell: house republicans may be less than willing to join him. rich: so is the bipartisan goodwill. the effects of the inauguration starting to disappear a bit from washington. some tourists remaining in town. we expect them to drop the same lines we have
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
? >> it is good for the economy. absolutely it is good for the economy. you know, there is a relationship between mood and spending. when people feel good they spend a little bit more. >> they feel good right now. >> they feel really good right now. very excited right now. >> reporter: there are the obvious things that my off of the shelves here like t-shirts and anything that helps folks identify with the 49ers. an estimate that fans national he will spend $11 billion on super bowl-related punches including beer and 5 million new television set fist. >> in general, san francisco -- television sets. >> in general, san francisco is an optimistic place and it is good for consumer spending. >> reporter: then, the stuff fans do while watching the game like consuming chicken wings, 8 million pounds of chips and another 8 million pounds of avocados. >> when we are in a situation like this that is just gripped the emotions of the entire city, really, nobody is left behind. everybody in some way is effected by this. and everyone gets involved. it is pretty m
said, you know, we're not there yet, the american economy is nos recovered, worried about the credit, and we kept it going, a real testament to him and his moral leadership on this. melissa: steve, are you that gracious? >> no, i wouldn't be that gracious. i give him a "d" -- melissa: oh, oh, a "d"! >> a generous "d," and i see what sigh san is saying in that i think the strength was he was more an ideolog, a strength, but he has to answer for the dramatically escalating debt that took place while he was treasury secretary. the fact that the president didn't take it very seriously, and then his comment to paul ryan i thought was a telling one saying to paul ryan we don't have a definitive solution to the problem, but we don't like yours. you got to have solutions if you're the secretary of treasury. melissa: tim, what do you think? can you cut it in the middle. we have an a and a d, what do you give him? >> actually, i feel right in the best place. i give him a c-plus, better than average, better than average. he had a tough job over the last four years, and i'm not sure anybody coul
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
population, a serious drain on the company's economy. frequent "varney & company" guest summed up japan's predicament in an interesting way, listen to this. >> you can see anecdotally they sell more adult diaper products than infant. stuart: is that true? >> yes, it is. stuart: wow, indeed. that's the dire situation in japan. contrast that with the united states. our proportion of old people far, far lower than japan, and lower than europe, too. a big part of that is because of immigran immigrants. now this, the former head of the head of the city teacher's union, that was years ago, she is, however, randy weingarten, now the head of the federation of teachers which is a part of the afl-cio and joins us in the next hour, and topic number one, the six-figure payout. we follow microsoft on this program, i own some of that stuff and we talked to an executive who had the ear of bill gates, he says microsoft chief steve ballmer has to go. also coming up, big news i should say from two names you know, google and ibm, we're following both of them at the opening bell. may, everybody, cheer up,
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
minneapolis. >>> from weather to the economy, you hope the world economy is on wall street, but now in switzerland. many are in davos for the annual world economic forum but this year their focus is not on europe. anthony mason joins us from davos. anthony good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. maybe it's the bracing mountain air but there's been a pronounced mood swing in davos. 12 months ago it looked like the financial collapse in europe could lead to a global recession. what a difference a year makes. in the hallways and meeting rooms of the world economic forum where top bankers, business leaders and politicians come every year to swap intelligence there's a sense the global economy has finally turned a corner. as ken frazier, ceo of pharmaceutical giant merck. >> i think the u.s. economy is poised to take off. i think it's been through some tough times. i think it's the strongest economy in the world. >> reporter: the imf forecasts the global economy will grow 3.5% this year a healthy number, and if there's debate about how soon things will ge
or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good id
21 allows to continue to improve the way we make, the way we move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs. map 21 helps short project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion, and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 are based on an innovate shun initiative known as every day counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with everyday counts. let's hear it for victor menendez what he has done and his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's trb conference. better, faster, and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, beg thanks goes to peter rogoff of a the train crash here in washington, peter and i sided we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety bu
talking to are more optimistic about the u.s. economy. here's what ken frazer, c.e.o. of the pharmaceutical giant merck, had to say. >> i think the u.s. economy is poised to take off. i think it's been through some tough times. i think it's the strongest economy in the world. i think the big challenge for us is to come up with long-term solutions to the debt and deficit situation that will create greater certainty for people to make investments. >> reporter: the c.e.o. of j.p. morgan chase, jamie dimon, said here in davos that he thinks the table is set now for strong economic growth in the u.s. the c.e.o. of coca-cola told me here "we're still walking on ice" but if his words "everyone now believes the ice is going to hold." >> pelley: but, anthony, the last financial catastrophe was because a bubble burst. and what are the chances this is a bubble in the stock market? >> reporter: well, i think scott, some people are concerned the market may be getting a little ahead of itself here, that ordinary investors are rushing back in. but it is fueled by some very encou
the economy. if the head of the fed can't get it right, i doubt the brains trying to come up with rules and regulations have any idea, and i don't think if they know what the news is next week. i don't put any creens into them. >> you know, if you are an investor and have money in the money market funds, follow the story. it could be meaningful to you. gary, greg, thanks for coming on. great to have you here. appreciate your time. >> thanks. >> thanks, gerri. gerri: strong earnings report sent stocks higher today on wall street after breaking through 1500 yesterday for the first time since 2007, the streak of gains in eight days, the longest in 2004, hurray, and the dow in spitting distance of 14,000. the nasdaq posted gains today despite another down day from apple. exxon is the most valuable company by market cap. apple's stock on the decline from earlier this week dropping 2 two more percent today. thanks to the oil giant, there's a market cap of $5 billion higher than apple. that's big. a lot more still to come in the hour including how more waste, fraud, and abuse in washington is
month. visit choosenissan.com. road and track called sentra an economy car minus the look and feel of an economy car. wonder how civic and corolla look and feel about that. the all-new nissan sentra, with best-in-class mpg. lease for $169 per month. visit choosenissan.com. >>> initial estimates say the crowd at yesterday's inaugural was at least 1 million people. that's down from the 1.8 million who came out to see president obama sworn in the first time, but even so, a turnout of a million people put's obama's second inaugural at one of the biggest ever. look at that crowd. it's almost double who turned out to see george w.'s second inaugural and tops the 800,000 who saw bill clinton sworn in. before obama the previous crowd estimate record was 1.2 million who came out for lbj, lyndon johnson's inaugural back in '65. we'll be right back. in america today we're running out of a vital resource we need to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them
class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you're looking for the right answer. >> where joe, i want to bring up something that my friend john podhoretz mentioned, and i say that carefully because reihan salam, my name has up been butchered by others, s
we won't view immigrants so hostilely when he actually need them here contributing to our economy. so i'm confident that with this sort of renewed effort on both sides of the aisle to work out something that is doable, that will have the proper enforcement mechanisms but the proper pathway for people to come in out of the shadows and be fully participating members of our society, i'm very confident that we can get there. i really for the first time in the ten years that i have served in congress, really see this as a very real possibility. >> yeah. my concern is i agree with everything you said in terms of economics and social issues, fine. my concern is a government that cannot enforce its laws begins to crumble and our failure to have an honest, open, progressive immigration policy has been a disaster and it's not good for the future of our government that it can't do the job of enforcing its own borders which is essential to any country on this planet. stephanie, last thought. are we going to do this this time? >> well, chris, we have to try. i think there's a reason why we're talk
could be the longest u.s. great recession but others warn the economy is still shaky. we're pleased to have him here. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> i hear from davos where there a's a lot of smart people, i hear the economy is very fragile. on the other hand they're looking to america to have a good rekonkry. >> we're in a better place than the rest of the world. the euro crisis is not over although it seemed to have been abated. that's going to keep happening. the chinese economy is in bigger trouble than it's been in a long time. so that's worrisome. and so in the u.s., the real problem ultimately is a political problem because our economy is slowly recovering. things are starting to turn around and what could spiral us backward really is if one of these upcoming fights on sequestration or the next debt cellin ceiling, you know, finally causes it to -- >> that is sort of baked in the cake. everybody expects they're going keep kicking it down the road. why, then, do we have a surge in stock market? >> one is that corporate profits are very good. but don't forget, corporate com
the economy and barack obama came on and was in a joef yell mood. >> for all of the talk we had during the campaign ofment o prt obama's ability to raise money it would be a million dollar campaign and the talk mitt romney had more corporate donors it would be a wash in cash. the president had no trouble raising enough money to get himself re-elected it is thanks in part to an incredible network he has built over the years. talk about the importance of money in this election, charles. >> he has never backed for money. in 2008 he was the first to go without the federal matching money so he could raise unlimited amounts he did and he crushed mccain in terms of the fundraising. he is commuting with the 53 percent his way of reaching to try to bring us all together after a campaign where he ran into 47 percent. it is a night where they are just having a good time. i wouldn't take any of it too seriously. it is a minor bit. you have to give him a pass on inauguration. he's having a good time and this is the money essentially to fund all of the festivities he which he won fair and square. >>
the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> our second story "outfront," deep freeze. it's the talk for a lot of people in this country tonight. the sub zero temperatures creating dangerous conditions for areas that have not felt the extreme chill in years. we got very spoiled here in new york. it was kind of springtime all winter. the cold now is blamed for at least four death and it follows the warmest year on record. some scientists are blaming global warming for these ups an downs, but the public doesn't seem so convinced. the number of people who believe in global warming is actually down 8% from 2008. only 45% believe it is a manmade problem, which is down from 54% back in 2008. "outfront" tonight, erick erickson and john avlon. so, the president in his inauguration speech took on those who don't believe in climate chang
every year. the entire g.d.p. of the entire u.s. economy he is $16 trillion. this is about 25% of the economy. we're not making the argument all spend in washington but it's all control coming through washington every year. that's why there is is no incentive to ever cut anything. these guys are the beneficiary of that $4 trillion. >> sean: wait. where is a sense of patriotism, duty, responsibility to future generations? you say there is no incentive. i thought they are supposed to serve the public. and when you have to rob our children of 46 cents of every dollar we are spending now, i would think there has got to be some. >> the way the founders look at washington and the way it used to be a generation ago. people would come to washington and public service walking away from businesses. come for period of time. serve in the executive branch whether they were republicans or democrats. people would come and serve in congress and then go home. today, that's what i'm talking about extraction. when peter and i talk about that not just extracting tax revenues. getting the best and
or bellwethers for the stock, the overall u.s. stock market and the economy. and they're converging right now. eric marshall, at 417 billion dollars in market cap on both of these companies, who do you see is having the best value opportunity right now? exxon mobil or apple? >> i would be hesitant. they're both very -- two very different companies. i would use two different methodologies to value them. i can tell you at the hodges funds we believe that the future, any stock price is really just a function, a future earnings and cash flow. those are the things that we would be focused on. when you look at apple's valuation coming down here you really have to dissect and look at what are they going to earn over the next few years, what type of cash flow are they going to generate for the shareholders? and if you think that that is a good value at this price, it certainly is a lot easier to make an argument than it was when the stock was at 600 or 700. >> do you like it? need to be focused on. really >> do you like it? >> sounds like you do. >> well, you know, we're focused in our small cap fund
of the american economy, as of late 2012, there have been several civil suits filed against major wall street financial firms, but not a single criminal prosecution. in this edition, we look back at the 2008 financial crisis and the failure of government regulators to prosecute those who might be criminally responsible. later, lehman brothers bankruptcy investigator anton valukas shares his findings on the collapse of the giant investment bank where no senior official has ever faced charges in the biggest bankruptcy in u.s. history. but first we begin with a nine-month 60 minutes investigation looking for wall street cases that might have prosecutorial merit. in december 2011, steve kroft reported on two such cases. we begin with a woman named eileen foster, a former senior executive at countrywide financial, one of the epicenters of the crisis. >> do you believe that there are people at countrywide who belong behind bars? >> yes. >> do you want to give me their names? >> no. >> would you give their names to a grand jury if you were asked? >> yes. >> but eileen foster has never been asked, an
tax cuts that would've tripled our -- crippled our economy. would also called on washington not to lose sight of what remains our top priority, job growth. we called for smarter, locally targeted investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both part
at the corporation that has greater revenues than the economies of many western nations. this is a little under an hour. >> hi. thank you so much for joining a state. congratulations on what is quite an achievement. >> thank you. >> first of all, i really enjoyed the book. it read like a novel. i mean, it really read like non-fiction in places, which are short and as a writer you encountered some of that feeling as well. i know as a reporter who has dealt with exxon mobil a good chunk of her career, how difficult it probably was to probe this company. let's start there. white exxon mobil? added you come to the subject? why this company? how was it -- how did it differ from some of your other subjects? >> it is an interesting -- to me it was an interesting journey because, as you point out, i started out as a business reporter on wall street when i was young. then i went abroad and worked on more national subjects. after september 11 the road about the origins of those attacks and 20 years of american covert policy in afghanistan. then after that was over i thought, i want to keep writing about
democracies, because of the nature of our energy economy, they all have big state oil companies. bp, and mexico, and most of the states have privatized them but even bp -- were article shatly stalestate owned as recent as the 1980s, exxonmobil is our state oil company. they're a much more coherent expression of our national energy policy then the federal government is, and they're just as powerful relative to the state as tal is so france and even more. so only in america would we have a state oil company that lives in opposition to the state in which it resides. rex tillerson recently told scouting magazine his favorite book is atlas shrugged by ayn rand, and it suggests an attitude of skepticism toward the government that is peculiar. now, a company in france or italy or britain would be -- would have all again to the same universities as the president of the united states, they would be buddies and a locking sense of world view and maybe even,s they would work arm in arm with the french government abroad in order to secure they're -- their interests, but this country, we're skept
of the american economy by that. but also very clearly having a pathway to earned legalization is an essential element, and i think that we are largely moving in that direction as an agreement. >> what do you want? senator mccain said it's helpful that president obama is out on the road. what do you want to hear from him? how committed is he to getting this done? he also wants gun control. >> right. well, i was at the white house on friday with the congressional hispanic caucus leadership, and the president made it very clear in that discussion that this was a top legislative priority for him in this session of the congress and that he expects to work with all of us in an effort to achieve the goal, and he's fully committed to it, and i think that's why this week he starts the clock by the speech he's going to make out in las vegas. >> and that pathway to citizenship, that has to be in there? >> absolutely. latino voters in -- first of all, americans support it in poll after poll. secondly, latino voters expect it. thirdly, democrats want it, and, fourth, republicans need it. >> shouldn't the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)